The Animals – Bonici contract 1964

Animals in Scotland 1964

House of the Rising Sun https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRXb7K7k7bQ “House of the Rising Sun” was a trans-Atlantic hit: after reaching the top of the UK chart singles in July 1964.

  • The Animals recorded this in one take, as they had perfected the song from years of performing it on the road. The Animals’ drummer John Steel recalls in 1000 UK #1 Hits by Jon Kutner and Spencer Leigh, “We Played Liverpool on May 17 1964 and then drove to London where Mickie (Most) had booked a studio for ITV’s Ready Steady Go! Because of the reaction we were getting to ‘Rising Sun,’ we asked to record it and he said, ‘Okay we’ll do it at the same session.’ We set up for balance, played a few bars for the engineer – it was mono with no overdubs – and we only did one take. We listened to it and Mickie said, ‘That’s it, it’s a single.’ The engineer said it was too long, but instead of chopping out a bit, Mickie had the courage to say, ‘We’re in a microgroove world now, we will release it.’ A few weeks later it was #1 all over the world. When we knocked The Beatles off the top in America, they sent us a telegram which read, ‘Congratulations from The Beatles (a group)’.” The producer Mickie Most recalls, “Everything was in the right place, the planets were in the right place, the stars were in the right place and the wind was blowing in the right direction. It only took 15 minutes to make so I can’t take much credit for the production. It was just a case of capturing the atmosphere in the studio.”
  • The Animals had 13 more Top 40 hits in the US, becoming one of the most successful British Invasion bands in the United States. They split up in 1968 over various music and business issues. Burdon told us: “I don’t think that The Animals got a chance to evolve. We were the first to admit that we took Blues songs from American artists, but if the Animals had stuck together and worked together instead of worrying about who was getting all the money, we could have evolved more and come out with more music to be proud of.”
  • Alan Price was the only band member given credit for arranging the track, meaning he is paid almost all the royalties. Their record company told the other members that there was not enough room to list them as arrangers. http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=439

Promoter Albert Bonici was livid at the time as he was put off by the Animals managers who decided to renig on an agreement with Mr. Bonici over a return visit to the north of Scotland [who first appeared in Elgin as the Alan Parsons Combo with Eric Burdon]. He was not in the habit of suing over lost revenue though an exception was when The Dave Clark Five decided to break their contract to go to the United States. Here is the correspondence from 1964:

It’s My Life https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HNzmrEgz_GI  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/

Eric Burdon and The Animals were a popular band along with The Beatles, The Kinks, The Rolling Stones, and The Who in the UK and US in the early 1960s. Both The Alan Parsons Combo and The Animals played gigs at The Two Red Shoes and other small venues during their early years. They called it a “Beat Ball” when they played the small dance hall in Elgin. Albert Bonici was able to hire them again to play in Glasgow. In the late 60’s, Eric Burdon settled in San Francisco and formed the band “War”.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Animals
http://kosmo.hubpages.com/hub/Is-Eric-Burdon-One-of-the-Greatest-Rockers-of-All-Time

https://scotbeat.wordpress.com/2014/02/18/eric-burdon-and-the-animals/

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About

My research began in 2007 as a visitor to the north of Scotland. In the early 1950s, Albert Bonici began promoting dances though it had been an ambition since his teenage years. When he and Henry Robertson co-organized a string of jazz dances in the north Scotland, they could not have predicted the enormous success of the venture. Albert Bonici became one of the most respected promoters in the UK having arranged a high volumn of music venues throughout the north of Scotland which delighted music lovers during the height of the jazz and beat music era. Whilst known for booking the Beatles at the beginning of their 1963 tours, Albert Bonici brought most of the top British acts to north-east Scotland besides working with Scottish musicians to boost their careers. SCOTBEAT was created to share a bit of history about the BEAT years in Scotland and also a tribute to a man with a vision who, with the help of his family and staff, created a happening that is still fondly remembered by those who attended dances and concerts. Albert A Bonici hosted many up and coming bands who went on to gain international acclaim for their contributions. Besides other local resources and interviews, SCOTBEAT presents exclusive photos, adverts, and documents from the A Bonici Archives [circa 1960s]. Unless otherwise agreed, materials are not to be used for financial gain and ask that you respect the terms below. Materials presented are not to be used for financial gain without consent. © 2014-2019 SCOTBEAT.wordpress.com. All rights reserved. No part of this web site may be copied, redistributed, broadcast or published in any form without crediting this blog and/or copyright websites mentioned. All correspondence, flyers, programs, and photos from the Bonici Archives are not to appear in print other than through the propietor of SCOTBEAT. Use of the site signifies your agreement to all of these terms without condition. Please reference https://scotbeat.wordpress.com when sharing materials found here as the site is continuously updated to present the subject matter accurately and as a historical resource. Thank you.

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Posted in 1960's pop music

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